Vancouver Summer Program

The Vancouver Summer Program (VSP) in the Faculty of Education is a four-week program developed for international undergraduate students from partner universities.

The program provides the opportunity for students to learn about a wide range of education-related topics in a Canadian context, while also exploring Canadian society and culture first-hand through engaging classes, social activities, and intercultural workshops.

vsp


Vancouver International Summer Program in Education

The program consists of a package of two non-credit courses, each with approximately 39 hours of class time. Courses are directed by UBC faculty members.

Classes are interactive and may include class discussions, group work, guest lecturers, and field trips.

As these are non-credit UBC courses, any course credit will be granted at the discretion of the participating universities.  Students/universities will be given grades letters for each course upon program completion. Students can select to register in one package. Partner universities can also request a specific package depending on the interest of their students.

June 2017 Academic Packages | June 4 – July 4

Education Package A - Teaching and Learning English

This package offers students a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching English. Both courses are designed for pre-service and in-service English teachers. Beginning with a close examination of English as a linguistic system, a means of communication, and a sociocultural practice, the package also considers a variety of approaches to the teaching of English, and provides a full range of teaching techniques and strategies.

Applied Linguistics for English Teachers

Successful language teachers need to understand more than just the structure and nature of the language(s) they teach: they also need to develop an understanding of the social, cultural, and ideological implications of language and language education. Language classrooms are diverse, multilingual, multicultural and multimodal places, presenting students and teachers with unique challenges. This course serves as a general introduction to theory and research concerning these issues as they relate to learning and teaching, from the perspective of applied linguistics. Topics to be discussed include: theories of first and second language learning; the relationship of theoretical issues in applied linguistics to educational practice; language variation; language attitudes and ideologies; world Englishes; language and globalization; language policy; language and gender; language and race, and more.

Introduction to Teaching and Learning English

This course provides a general theoretical overview of and some practical preparation for English language teaching (ELT). Its scope is diverse as it considers approaches to language teaching, a range of teaching techniques and strategies, learner needs, instructional contexts, assessment, and sociocultural concerns, as they pertain to teaching English in a variety of contexts. The course examines ways to teach listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary but always with a view to integrating these skills. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to and learn from active engagement in discussions on contemporary ELT issues and topics.

Education Package B – Language in Canada and Beyond

Canada is a country rich in languages. There are over 60 Indigenous languages, and the two languages of the original colonial settlers – English and French. And then there are the hundreds of languages brought to Canada by immigrants from around the world. The result is a multilingual, multicultural country that provides a perfect location for the study of English as a living, changing language. The courses in this package are designed to help students improve their own written and spoken English while they investigate the ways in which language works in different settings and across cultural spaces.

Language practices in Canada: A multilingual land

Successful language learners need to understand more than just the structure and nature of the language(s) they learn. Through in-class interactive sessions and field trips, this introductory course provides a broad and coherent overview of diverse language practices across multilingual contexts (such as Canada) and explores how this diversity impacts language learning and teaching. Students will have an opportunity to reflect on their own language choices in different contexts and develop critical thinking and collaborative work skills through class discussions and assignments. Topics to be discussed include: language variation according to age, ethnicity, class, race and gender; language variation in sports, entertainment, work, and the arts; language attitudes and ideologies. By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze functions of language in society and achieve a deeper understanding of how key course themes and concepts operate in language teaching and learning in multilingual contexts.

Language across borders and boundaries

Being able to communicate in multiple contexts and cultures is an important prerequisite for living and working in an increasingly globalized world. This course will provide students with an understanding of the diverse strategies of language use in and beyond the classroom. The course will help students to adapt their own language practices to a wide variety of social and cross-cultural settings and to analyze the language use of others. Diverse approaches to conceptualizing and analyzing language in use will be introduced. By the end of the course students, will be familiar with key sociolinguistic concepts, will have developed effective strategies for enhancing their language use in multiple settings, and be able to apply course content to helping others with their language use. Suitable for both students and teachers of English.

Education Package C – Classroom Management and Behavioural Assessment

Classroom Management

The course is designed to empower educators to develop a positive classroom climate and an effective learning environment in which teachers and their students engage in meaningful and successful learning experiences together. To achieve this goal, students will be introduced to current, evidence-based practices in school-wide, classroom and individual behaviour support. Classes will include lecture, discussion and small group activities that provide opportunities to develop skills in the application of these practices. Specific objectives of the course include developing student knowledge and skill in: (a) a proactive, preventive approach to classroom management; (b) school-wide positive behaviour support; (c) the design of a positive classroom environment; (d) the development of positive, nurturing relationships with students; (e) the use of positive reinforcement to strengthen prosocial behaviour; and (f) effective ways to respond to problem behaviour.

Assessment and Positive Behaviour Support in School and Community Settings

The course introduces students to the philosophy and methods of behavioural assessment and positive behaviour support with persons who engage in challenging behaviour in school and community contexts. Specific objectives of the course include developing student knowledge and/or skill in: (a) basic principles of behaviour change; (b) the features and values of positive behaviour support; (c ) ecological assessment of environments and functional assessment of persons with challenging behaviour; (d) the completion of summary hypothesis statements and competing behaviour pathway diagrams; (e) the design of multi-component behaviour support plans that are logically-linked to assessment results; and (f) the design of plans that are both technically sound and contextually-appropriate.

Education Package D - Culture, Creativity, and Learning Technologies

The Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy is on the cutting edge of implementing digital learning technologies across the curriculum in 21st century K-12 and university classrooms. Our professors infuse new media across the curriculum in ways that engage and inspire learners and are leaders in research of these ideas. This complementary course package will provide students with both theoretical and project-based learning, rooted in solo and collaborative contexts, as is fitting to exploring the uses and creation of digital learning tools, theories of digital learning, and international perspectives of the role of digital learners and curriculum.

Digital Media in Arts Education

This course is an introduction to teaching and learning with digital technologies through the creative arts. Beginning with an exploration of curriculum and pedagogy from an arts-based technological perspective, we will examine the multiple opportunities and challenges arising from using digital technologies to approach the creative arts in educational contexts. Using an up to date laboratory of computers, iPads, and synthesizers – students will work together in exploring digital music, video, photography, and other creative arts apps and software used in educational settings. Participants will take an active role in their learning processes – including setting goals, researching creative digital tools, engaging in peer-evaluation, participating in discussions, doing presentations, writing reflections, and seeking out relevant research readings and resources. This course will help students build a foundation for critical thinking about education, digital media, and the creative arts.

Learning Technologies and Creativity in the Digital Age

This course offers students a space to create and a community to explore ideas about integrating learning technologies in primary and secondary classrooms. Students will engage in this course as instructional designers, content creators, and tinkerers working together on personally or pedagogically meaningful projects. Learning involves defining problems and generating solutions, questioning assumptions, exercising ingenuity, prototyping, and experimenting with diverse ideas, materials, and perspectives. The educational philosophy underlying this course emphasizes project-based learning with digital media and technology. Students will have diverse opportunities to design innovative learning environments and create digital learning artifacts and resources. No background knowledge or experience is required for this package. Students will benefit from creative instructional strategies and technology-supported learning activities.

Education Package E - Early Childhood Education and Development

Our early childhood courses focus on creating exceptional educational programs for children between the ages of three to eight. The courses are carefully designed to introduce international students to research and theory pertaining to the education of young children. International students will be provided with opportunities to learn how theory is connected to practice by engaging in field study activities such as observing in early childhood classrooms and studying educational materials and resources that are used in Canadian early childhood classrooms.

Designing High Quality Curriculum in Early Childhood Settings

This course addresses the notion that children are natural learners. Students will learn about, discuss, and clarify important concepts and theories relative to early childhood education, including child development theory and the holistic nature of learning in the early years. The course highlights the idea that young children’s innate capacity to learn and teachers’ responses to children’s inquiries provide the foundation for the development of high quality early learning experiences for young children and impacts the type of programming that is created. Students will learn about designing appropriate daily routines and implementing teaching strategies for integrating different areas of learning, such as literacy, math, science, and art through inquiry and project-based learning. The course will also include observations in local early childhood settings.

Creating Environments to Support Learning in Early Childhood Settings

This course introduces students to the significant role that designing stimulating and nurturing early childhood classroom environments plays in children’s learning and in supporting all aspects of their development and growth. Students will learn about creating dynamic indoor and outdoor learning spaces for young children and the importance of providing children with original and natural educational materials and resources. The course will include visits to local state-of-the-art early childhood environments for young children

July 2017 Academic Packages | July 15 – August 15

Education Package A - Teaching and Learning English

This package offers students a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching English. Both courses are designed for pre-service and in-service English teachers. Beginning with a close examination of English as a linguistic system, a means of communication, and a sociocultural practice, the package also considers a variety of approaches to the teaching of English, and provides a full range of teaching techniques and strategies.

Applied Linguistics for English Teachers

Successful language teachers need to understand more than just the structure and nature of the language(s) they teach: they also need to develop an understanding of the social, cultural, and ideological implications of language and language education. Language classrooms are diverse, multilingual, multicultural and multimodal places, presenting students and teachers with unique challenges. This course serves as a general introduction to theory and research concerning these issues as they relate to learning and teaching, from the perspective of applied linguistics. Topics to be discussed include: theories of first and second language learning; the relationship of theoretical issues in applied linguistics to educational practice; language variation; language attitudes and ideologies; world Englishes; language and globalization; language policy; language and gender; language and race, and more.

Introduction to Teaching and Learning English

This course provides a general theoretical overview of and some practical preparation for English language teaching (ELT). Its scope is diverse as it considers approaches to language teaching, a range of teaching techniques and strategies, learner needs, instructional contexts, assessment, and sociocultural concerns, as they pertain to teaching English in a variety of contexts. The course examines ways to teach listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary but always with a view to integrating these skills. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to and learn from active engagement in discussions on contemporary ELT issues and topics.

Education Package B – Language in Canada and Beyond

Canada is a country rich in languages. There are over 60 Indigenous languages, and the two languages of the original colonial settlers – English and French. And then there are the hundreds of languages brought to Canada by immigrants from around the world. The result is a multilingual, multicultural country that provides a perfect location for the study of English as a living, changing language. The courses in this package are designed to help students improve their own written and spoken English while they investigate the ways in which language works in different settings and across cultural spaces.

Language practices in Canada: A multilingual land

Successful language learners need to understand more than just the structure and nature of the language(s) they learn. Through in-class interactive sessions and field trips, this introductory course provides a broad and coherent overview of diverse language practices across multilingual contexts (such as Canada) and explores how this diversity impacts language learning and teaching. Students will have an opportunity to reflect on their own language choices in different contexts and develop critical thinking and collaborative work skills through class discussions and assignments. Topics to be discussed include: language variation according to age, ethnicity, class, race and gender; language variation in sports, entertainment, work, and the arts; language attitudes and ideologies. By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze functions of language in society and achieve a deeper understanding of how key course themes and concepts operate in language teaching and learning in multilingual contexts.

Language across borders and boundaries

Being able to communicate in multiple contexts and cultures is an important prerequisite for living and working in an increasingly globalized world. This course will provide students with an understanding of the diverse strategies of language use in and beyond the classroom. The course will help students to adapt their own language practices to a wide variety of social and cross-cultural settings and to analyze the language use of others. Diverse approaches to conceptualizing and analyzing language in use will be introduced. By the end of the course students, will be familiar with key sociolinguistic concepts, will have developed effective strategies for enhancing their language use in multiple settings, and be able to apply course content to helping others with their language use. Suitable for both students and teachers of English.

Education Package C - Classroom Management and Behavioural Assessment

Classroom Management

The course is designed to empower educators to develop a positive classroom climate and an effective learning environment in which teachers and their students engage in meaningful and successful learning experiences together. To achieve this goal, students will be introduced to current, evidence-based practices in school-wide, classroom and individual behaviour support. Classes will include lecture, discussion and small group activities that provide opportunities to develop skills in the application of these practices. Specific objectives of the course include developing student knowledge and skill in: (a) a proactive, preventive approach to classroom management; (b) school-wide positive behaviour support; (c) the design of a positive classroom environment; (d) the development of positive, nurturing relationships with students; (e) the use of positive reinforcement to strengthen prosocial behaviour; and (f) effective ways to respond to problem behaviour.

Assessment and Positive Behaviour Support in School and Community Settings

The course introduces students to the philosophy and methods of behavioural assessment and positive behaviour support with persons who engage in challenging behaviour in school and community contexts. Specific objectives of the course include developing student knowledge and/or skill in: (a) basic principles of behaviour change; (b) the features and values of positive behaviour support; (c ) ecological assessment of environments and functional assessment of persons with challenging behaviour; (d) the completion of summary hypothesis statements and competing behaviour pathway diagrams; (e) the design of multi-component behaviour support plans that are logically-linked to assessment results; and (f) the design of plans that are both technically sound and contextually-appropriate.

Education Package D - Current Trends in North American Art Education

These courses are designed to introduce international students to research, theory, and practice pertaining to two significant and current trends in K-12 Art Education in North America: (i) contemporary art as a pedagogical and educational practice and (b) digital visual culture art education. International students will be provided with opportunities to learn how research and theory is connected to practice by engaging in field study and project based learning including engagement with educators and curators at significant cultural institutions in Vancouver such as The Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver Contemporary Art Gallery, The Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, and the Museum of Anthropology at UBC.

Pedagogical Possibilities of Contemporary Art Practice

This course will focus on contemporary art’s pedagogical and educational potential. During this course students will consider the theoretical and practice-based work emerging from the recent turn to education in contemporary art and curatorial practice, and they will study the implications of such work for K-12 art teaching and learning. Working with museum exhibitions and collections in Vancouver, students will investigate how contemporary artworks reveal aspects of the world to us and encourage us to view life from other perspectives; thereby extending and enlarging our understanding of the world and its operations. During this course, students will also study how the curators of such museum exhibitions and collections function in ways akin to art educators as they create conditions for others to come into contact with artworks and to experience them. Students will study how contemporary art and curatorial practice can suggest other ways of conceptualizing and practicing art education in and across a range of educative sites including schools, community settings, museums, and after-school programs.

Project-based Digital Visual Culture in Art Education

Through this course, students will learn theories of digital visual culture, including theories of new media, visual culture, visual literacy, and visual communication as it pertains to art education theory and practice in Canada. For the project component of the course, students will incorporate visual learning into setting up a virtual learning space, specifically in the virtual worlds of Second Life and Open Simulation. Students will deepen their understanding of virtual world pedagogy through this process. Toward the end of the program, students will experience teaching in their own virtual classroom using the virtual world pedagogy they have developed.

Education Package E - Culture, Creativity, and Learning Technologies

The Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy is on the cutting edge of implementing digital learning technologies across the curriculum in 21st century K-12 and university classrooms. Our professors infuse new media across the curriculum in ways that engage and inspire learners and are leaders in research of these ideas. This complementary course package will provide students with both theoretical and project-based learning, rooted in solo and collaborative contexts, as is fitting to exploring the uses and creation of digital learning tools, theories of digital learning, and international perspectives of the role of digital learners and curriculum.

Digital Media in Arts Education

This course is an introduction to teaching and learning with digital technologies through the creative arts. Beginning with an exploration of curriculum and pedagogy from an arts-based technological perspective, we will examine the multiple opportunities and challenges arising from using digital technologies to approach the creative arts in educational contexts. Using an up to date laboratory of computers, iPads, and synthesizers – students will work together in exploring digital music, video, photography, and other creative arts apps and software used in educational settings. Participants will take an active role in their learning processes – including setting goals, researching creative digital tools, engaging in peer-evaluation, participating in discussions, doing presentations, writing reflections, and seeking out relevant research readings and resources. This course will help students build a foundation for critical thinking about education, digital media, and the creative arts.

Learning Technologies and Creativity in the Digital Age

This course offers students a space to create and a community to explore ideas about integrating learning technologies in primary and secondary classrooms. Students will engage in this course as instructional designers, content creators, and tinkerers working together on personally or pedagogically meaningful projects. Learning involves defining problems and generating solutions, questioning assumptions, exercising ingenuity, prototyping, and experimenting with diverse ideas, materials, and perspectives. The educational philosophy underlying this course emphasizes project-based learning with digital media and technology. Students will have diverse opportunities to design innovative learning environments and create digital learning artifacts and resources. No background knowledge or experience is required for this package. Students will benefit from creative instructional strategies and technology-supported learning activities.

Education Package F - Food and Wellbeing - Learning the Connection

The Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy is in a unique position to be able to offer studies in food education that reflect international experience. This complementary course package will provide students with both theoretical and practical learning about food sustainability and the influence of our decisions. The course will be delivered by university faculty, chefs and teachers who will offer hands on experiences linked to thinking about food in both local and global ways.

Food – An Everyday Experience

Deciding what to eat is an everyday event that is experienced in every culture and location. Learning about food requires knowing more than just how to be a consumer. This is an introductory course that provides a broad overview of different foods, food safety and preparation techniques and explores how food decisions can support wellbeing. Students will have an opportunity to reflect on their own food choices and develop critical thinking and collaborative work skills through class discussions and assignments. Topics to be discussed include: food supply in the Western context and how this compares to students’ experiences; what influences our food choices; and everyday food practices and how these are linked to globalization. By the end of the course students will have participated in a range of activities including visits to farms and markets; experts who will talk about how they prepare and provide food; and teaching about foods from their culture.

Thoughtful Eating in a Globalized World

Developing understanding about how food is produced from farms, to production and final places for consumption from across a range of different cultural and geographic contexts is an important prerequisite for sustainability in an increasingly globalized world. The aims of this course are to help students develop understandings about sustainable food production and eating safe food. Topics of this course will introduce differences in food production as a cyclic process rather than one that is linear; food safety and eating for wellbeing. By the end of the course students will: be familiar with sustainability concepts; develop holistic strategies for eating that enhances wellbeing; and to be able to apply the learning to their everyday experiences. They will have experienced a range of locations where food is purchased and consumed; maintained a journal that will allow students to think about how people make their food decisions and considered the implications of different ways of eating that have an impact at local and global levels.

Education Package G - Exploring (IB) Internationally-minded Approaches to Education

Teaching, according to Brad Henry in Love, Learning, Hope not only inspires hope and ignites the imagination it also serves as one of the most dynamic, exciting and fulfilling professions of all. If you have ever considered a career in teaching you will want to enroll in this complementary package of courses. Designed for students considering teaching in an International Baccalaureate school setting, the courses will give you the opportunity not only to learn about teaching methods and strategies used in IB but also to practice them in a safe and supportive classroom environment. As well, you will learn about IB curriculum and assessment in IB’s four programs through direct presentation from experienced IB educators, student-led group projects and guided inquiry.

Effective Classroom Teaching (IB)

Consisting of four unique and highly regarded K to 12 programmes, an International Baccalaureate education is student-centred, focused on critical thinking and principled action, and internationally minded. In this course, students will be introduced to many of the core skills and attributes which help define effective IB teaching. These include inquiry-based instruction, professionally focused collaborative teams, cooperative teaching approaches, Socratic dialogue and student metacognition. Students will have the opportunity to work in group settings with their classmates, engage in real-life Case Studies and learn from one another in a setting which is safe and supportive. By the end of the program, students will have a much better understanding of IB pedagogy and be well positioned to decide if a full International Baccalaureate Certificate in Teaching and Learning is for them.

Curriculum Design and Student Evaluation (IB)

The second of the two courses examining International Baccalaureate practice is focused on curriculum – more specifically what is termed the written, taught and assessed curriculum of IB. To begin the course, students will be introduced to a broad examination of the concept of curriculum following which they will learn how it is enacted in each of IB’s four programmes: PYP, MYP, DP and CP. In addition to the frameworks and content of these programmes, students will also discover how international mindedness, collaboration and service are key to the IB. The course will conclude with an examination of assessment and evaluation, both in general terms and more specifically how it is practiced in each of the IB programmes. The course is highly interactive in nature and designed to allow students time to pose their own questions and reflect on their own learnings. As with the complementary course, it will help students decide if they wish to pursue the full IBCTL.

Education Package H - Early Childhood Education and Development

Our early childhood courses focus on creating exceptional educational programs for children between the ages of three to eight. The courses are carefully designed to introduce international students to research and theory pertaining to the education of young children. International students will be provided with opportunities to learn how theory is connected to practice by engaging in field study activities such as observing in early childhood classrooms and studying educational materials and resources that are used in Canadian early childhood classrooms.

Designing High Quality Curriculum in Early Childhood Settings

This course addresses the notion that children are natural learners. Students will learn about, discuss, and clarify important concepts and theories relative to early childhood education, including child development theory and the holistic nature of learning in the early years. The course highlights the idea that young children’s innate capacity to learn and teachers’ responses to children’s inquiries provide the foundation for the development of high quality early learning experiences for young children and impacts the type of programming that is created. Students will learn about designing appropriate daily routines and implementing teaching strategies for integrating different areas of learning, such as literacy, math, science, and art through inquiry and project-based learning. The course will also include observations in local early childhood settings.

Creating Environments to Support Learning in Early Childhood Settings

This course introduces students to the significant role that designing stimulating and nurturing early childhood classroom environments plays in children’s learning and in supporting all aspects of their development and growth. Students will learn about creating dynamic indoor and outdoor learning spaces for young children and the importance of providing children with original and natural educational materials and resources. The course will include visits to local state-of-the-art early childhood environments for young children.

Education Package I - School Curriculum and Educational Leadership

The Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy and The Department of Educational Studies combine their strengths to offer this exciting package on school curriculum and educational leadership. These courses are intended to introduce international students to research, theories and practices in school curriculum and educational leadership. Both courses use a theme-based approach to engage participants with works of North American scholars and to animate discussions on their relevance and possible applications in global educational settings.

Introduction to Curriculum and Pedagogy

This course offers an introduction to North American perspectives and practices in curriculum and pedagogy. Curriculum is approached in this course as an on-going living document that continually invites teachers to find ways to engage, inspire, transform, and intellectually challenge students’ learning experience, with careful consideration of suitable pedagogies. This course introduces the curricular of planning, designing, improvising and analyzing, through the exploration of readings and discussions from diverse works of North American curriculum and pedagogy theorists, drawing on examples spanning a wide range of disciplines and including cross-cutting themes such as multiculturalism. As part of the course, participants will have an opportunity to create a curriculum document specific to their own area of interest.

Educational Leadership in School Settings

Schools are more than human communities, where teachers and students live and learn together - they are also public instruments reflecting wider societal orientations within specific sociocultural context (Manzer, 1994). With this in mind, this course is built around four major themes to explore educational leadership in school settings. Participants will reflect on the philosophical, historical, anthropological, sociological, and economic assumptions underlying concepts of educational leadership and power. They will examine several, sometimes conflicting, models of educational leadership. They will analyze how the policy context of educational leadership is understood and constructed within various socio-cultural, political, and economic realities and will review how educational leadership is studied in terms of conceptual models. The course will also address ethical issues associated with educational leadership across cultures.

Program Details

Participants

Participants are undergraduate students studying education or education-related topics, who have completed two years of university prior to joining the program. Students with less than two years university may be considered.

Participants must be proficient in English (all classes will be taught in English) and have a strong academic background.

Program Size

Departments may set minimum and maximum enrollment limits for individual packages. The minimum enrollment is generally 24 students, though some packages may have higher minimums. Packages with low enrollment may be cancelled. Students will be informed if their first choice package is full or has been cancelled and will be given the option to choose another package. Students are advised to register as early as possible to get their first choice of package.

Schedules vary depending on the package selected. Typically, classes are held 4-5 days a week with one day or one afternoon of free time per week. A typical schedule would include:

  • 9:30-12:30 | Morning class
  • 12:30-13:30 | Lunch break
  • 13:30-16:30 | Afternoon class

The program includes a city tour, a welcome celebration and orientation to the UBC campus and the Faculty of Education, a farewell luncheon, and social/cultural activities.

Program Dates: June 4 - July 4, 2017

The program will run for four weeks between June 4th - July 4th, 2017, with Orientation scheduled for the first Monday during that period. Students should plan to arrive in Vancouver on June 4th.

Program Dates: July 15 - August 15, 2017

The program will run for four weeks between July 15th - August 15, 2017, with Orientation scheduled for the first Monday during that period. Students should plan to arrive in Vancouver on July 15th.

Customized Packages

Customized packages may be available for groups of 24 or more. Please contact us for further information.

Accommodation is provided on the university campus with easy access to classes, libraries, sports facilities and transportation. Students are supported by Faculty of Education staff and volunteers.

The 2017 package fee is $4,750 (Canadian Dollars) per student. This includes:

  • Course tuition
  • Medical insurance
  • Group airport transfer and city tour
  • Shared accommodation on UBC campus
  • Orientation and farewell events
  • Course materials
  • Social activities (optional trips may require an additional fee)

Students need to meet their institution’s requirements for studying abroad and must be proficient in English and have a strong academic background. Participating universities should notify UBC of their interest in the program well in advance so that accommodation and instructors can be booked.

Please contact us for further information.

We regret that we are unable to accept applications directly from individual students. Please have your home institution’s international or study abroad office contact us for further information.

Social and Cultural Activities

The program includes a City Tour, welcome and farewell lunches, and many social activities in the evenings and during weekends. Some of these activities are included in the program fee while others are subsidized.

Activities may include museum visits, outdoor activities such as canoeing and cycling, with plenty of opportunity to explore sites of interest in Vancouver, as well as weekend or day trips to places such as Whistler and Vancouver Island.


Welcome to Canada’s West Coast

Vancouver is located in the southwest corner of British Columbia – one of Canada’s 10 provinces and 3 territories – and is 40 minutes away from the United States border.

With a population of 2.1 million, Vancouver is consistently rated as one of the best places to live in the world in terms of quality of life, opportunities, cultural diversity, political stability, and a healthy environment.

Canada is a safe country with a stable economy, an excellent health care system and social services.


Discover the best destinations on the West Coast:


UBC  Faculty of Education prepares professionals for practice in a wide range of education-related fields, from preschool through adulthood.

For more than 50 years, the Faculty of Education has served the international education community through leadership in research, service, and advocacy.

UBC Faculty of Education prepares many of British Columbia’s elementary teachers and secondary teachers for service in their chosen professions, as well as special needs and First Nations teachers, counsellors, school administrators, school psychologists, and vocational rehabilitation counsellors.


Discover UBC Vancouver

More than 400 hectares in size, the stunning UBC campus is surrounded by forest on three sides and the Pacific Ocean on the fourth, and is just a 30 minute bus ride to Vancouver’s downtown core. More than 19,000 students, faculty, staff and other residents live, work and learn together at UBC.

The campus includes great parks and trails, world-class museums and recreation, as well as shops and services. It is home to the UBC Library — one of Canada’s leading academic libraries, The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts — one of the world’s great concert halls, The Arthur Erickson designed Museum of Anthropology — Canada’s largest teaching museum, and The Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre — 2010 Winter Olympics Ice Hockey Venue.


Where to start

What to see at UBC

Discover all UBC campus has to offer: Museums and galleries, gardens, music and performing arts.

attractions.ubc.ca

What to do on campus

There's always something happening at UBC. Find out here:

events.ubc.ca


To learn more about the Vancouver Summer Program in Education, or to inquire about customized programs in Education, please contact:

Angel Xu
Office of Senior Advisor International
IDP.educ@ubc.ca
1.604.827.5254


For applications and general program information, please contact:

Ms. Teresa Sham
International Short Study Programs Manager
Office of the Provost and Vice President Academic, UBC
teresa.sham@ubc.ca
1.604.822.0563


Institutions in the Asia Pacific Region, please contact:

Ms. Winty Cheung
Executive Director
UBC Asia Pacific Regional Office, Hong Kong
winty.cheung@apro.ubc.ca
852.2111.4401


Institutions in India, please contact:

Mr. Stephen Kumar
Executive Associate
UBC India Liaison Office
New Delhi, India
ndelhi.ubc@live.com
91.99.53481067